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  • Highway, bridge money at risk: Senate to vote
  • FILE - This April 14, 2014 file photo shows a section of the I-75 Phase II modernization project under way in Dayton, Ohio. The Senate is set to take up legislation to keep federal highway money flowing to states, with just three days left before the government plans to start slowing down payments. The House passed a $10.8 billion bill last week that would pay for highway and transit aid through the end of May 2015 if transportation spending is maintained at current levels. Under a schedule outlined by Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev., the Senate would take up that bill Tuesday. (AP Photo/Skip Peterson, File)WASHINGTON (AP) ? Racing to adjourn for the summer, the Senate scheduled major votes Tuesday on proposals to keep federal highway funds flowing across the nation ? billions of dollars to avert layoffs for construction workers and shutdowns of road and bridge projects just before the November elections.



  • Jury awards Ventura $1.8M in defamation case
  • FILE - In this July 23, 2014, file photo, Taya Kyle, the widow of Navy SEAL Chris Kyle, arrives at U.S. District Court wearing dog tags around her neck in St. Paul, Minn. Jurors in former Minnesota Gov. Jesse Ventura's defamation lawsuit against "American Sniper" author Chris Kyle have gone home for the night Monday, July 28, 2014, but will return Tuesday. (AP Photo/The Star Tribune, David Joles, File) MANDATORY CREDIT; ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS OUT; MAGAZINEES OUT; TWIN CITIES LOCAL TELEVISION OUTST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) ? A jury awarded former Minnesota Gov. Jesse Ventura $1.8 million on Tuesday in his lawsuit against the estate of "American Sniper" author Chris Kyle.



  • Appeals court upholds labels on meat packages
  • WASHINGTON (AP) ? A federal appeals court on Tuesday upheld new government rules requiring labels on packaged steaks, ribs and other cuts of meat to say where the animals were born, raised and slaughtered.

  • Crews make gains on 2 California wildfires
  • Rick Ogden who lost his home in the Sand Fire, waits for fire updates from officials at the evacuation center in Shingle Springs, Calif., on Monday, July 28, 2014. Their home of 12 years was completely destroyed at 2pm on Saturday.(AP Photo/Steve Yeater)SHINGLE SPRINGS, Calif. (AP) ? Some firefighters battling a Northern California wildfire that prompted evacuation orders for more than 400 homes before it was brought under control were dispatched to other fires, while evacuation orders for about half of the homes in the path of a blaze in Yosemite National Park were lifted.



  • Obama expected to announce US sanctions on Russia
  • WASHINGTON (AP) ? President Barack Obama is expected to announce a new round of U.S. sanctions against Russia Tuesday.

  • Argentina fights with debt holdouts; default nears
  • BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP) ? Argentina risks financial default unless it reaches an agreement with a group of holdout bondholders by Wednesday. Here are the issues at stake:

  • US appeals panel strikes down Miss. abortion law
  • JACKSON, Miss. (AP) ? A federal appeals court panel has ruled that a Mississippi law that would close the state's only abortion clinic is unconstitutional.

  • Music aside, Queen of Soul is pumped for fair food
  • FILE - In a Thursday, May 29, 2014 file photo, singer Aretha Franklin looks up while seated on stage during Harvard University commencement ceremonies, in Cambridge, Mass. Franklin, the Queen of Soul says she's looking forward to tracking down one of the powdered sugar-covered confections while she's at the Ohio State Fair to perform on Thursday, July 31, 2014. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) ? Aretha Franklin is jazzed about more than music at the Ohio State Fair: She's also looking forward to the food.



  • AP source: Gordon hires attorney for NFL hearing
  • Cleveland Browns wide receiver Josh Gordon makes a catch during NFL football training camp, Saturday, July 26, 2014, in Berea, Ohio. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan)BEREA, Ohio (AP) ? Josh Gordon has a new, high-profile teammate to help him fight the NFL.



  • Merkel says new EU sanctions against Russia were unavoidable
  • The European Union's decision to impose broad sanctions against Russia was "unavoidable" after its actions in Ukraine and it is now up to Moscow to make the next move, German Chancellor Angela Merkel said on Tuesday. Earlier, the EU agreed for the first time to impose sanctions against Russian oil companies, banks and defense firms, by far the strongest international action yet over Moscow's support for rebels in eastern Ukraine. "The decision today was thus unavoidable," Merkel said in a statement, adding that EU leaders had repeatedly warned Moscow that the annexation of Crimea and continued destabilisation of east Ukraine were not acceptable. "It is now up to the leadership in Russia to decide whether they want to go the way of de-escalation and cooperation," Merkel said.

  • AP NewsAlert
  • JACKSON, Miss. (AP) ? US appeals court panel strikes down law that could have closed only Miss. abortion clinic.

  • France hands over suspected Jewish Museum gunman to Belgium
  • One of Nemmouche's lawyers, Sebastien Courtoy, talks to the media as Mehdi Nemmouche is extradited to Belgium, on July 29, 2014, in BrusselsFrance handed over to Belgium on Tuesday the man suspected of carrying out a deadly shooting in May at the Jewish Museum in Brussels. A spokeswoman for the Belgian police told AFP that Mehdi Nemmouche, a 29-year-old Frenchman of Algerian descent, had been brought from Paris to Brussels. "He will be interrogated," added spokeswoman Tine Hollevoet, who declined to give further details. His lawyer Sebastien Courtoy told the media that Nemmouche was irritated by the leaking to the press of statements he has made during police questioning in the last two months.



  • Feds end effort to reclaim mummy mask for Egypt
  • FILE - In this April 22, 2011 photo provided by the St. Louis Art Museum is the funeral mask of Lady Ka-Nefer-Nefer that has been at the center of a custody battle for several years. Officials said Tuesday, July 29, 2014, they will take no further legal action to reclaim the 3,200-year-old mummy mask for Egypt. It will stay at the St. Louis Art Museum. (AP Photo/St. Louis Art Museum, File)ST. LOUIS (AP) ? A 3,200-year-old mummy mask at the center of a years-long custody fight will stay at the St. Louis Art Museum now that the U.S. government is giving up its fight to reclaim it for Egypt.



  • 3 sites make shortlist for new FBI headquarters
  • WASHINGTON (AP) ? The headquarters of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, a storied building named after the agency's first director, would be relocated out of the nation's capital and into the suburbs under a federal government proposal released Tuesday.

  • Legal fallout begins for 'Jesus Christ Superstar'
  • FILE - This April 4, 2014 file photo shows British composer Andrew Lloyd Webber at a press conference and performance in New York to announce the "Jesus Christ Superstar" North American arena tour. The abrupt cancellation of this summer?s North American arena tour of "Jesus Christ Superstar" is heading to court. The Really Useful Group, the London-based production company of ?Superstar? composer Andrew Lloyd Webber, said Tuesday, July 29, 2014, that it was taking legal action against producer Michael Cohl for the ?unilateral decision? to scuttle the tour, which was to star punk legend John "Johnny Rotten" Lydon and Michelle Williams of Destiny's Child. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)NEW YORK (AP) ? The abrupt cancellation of this summer's North American arena tour of "Jesus Christ Superstar" is apparently not being forgiven.



  • U.N. aviation body to form task force on airline safety after Ukraine crash
  • MONTREAL (Reuters) - The U.N.'s aviation body said on Tuesday it would convene a high-level meeting next February on airline safety in the wake of the shooting down of a Malaysian airliner over Ukraine. The International Civil Aviation Organization also said it was setting up a task force with the airline industry and other aviation bodies to look at how safety information can be collected and distributed properly. (Reporting by Allison Martell and Allison Lampert; Writing by David Ljunggren; Editing by Amran Abocar and James Dalgleish)

  • Elegant Louvre Garden in Paris infested with rats
  • A rat runs next to a Maillol Statue in The Tuileries gardens of the Louvre Muesum in Paris, France, Tuesday, July 29, 2014. Rats have been on the rampage on the grass in broad daylight, defying death threats from sanitation workers. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)PARIS (AP) ? Rats are on the rampage in the elegant garden of the Louvre Museum, so bold they romp on the grass in broad daylight, defying death threats from sanitation workers and scaring tourists.



  • Shelling adds to mounting civilian toll in Ukraine
  • DONETSK, Ukraine (AP) ? Shells smashed into a residential neighborhood of Donetsk on Tuesday as Ukrainian forces intensified their campaign to encircle the rebel stronghold. The shelling killed at least two people, blew gaping holes in an apartment block and raised fears that the city is on the verge of severe bloodshed.

  • New Hampshire man held on $1M in teen's kidnapping
  • This booking photo released by the New Hampshire Attorney General's Office shows Nathaniel E. Kibby, 34, of Gorham, N.H., arrested Monday, July 28, 2014 and charged with one count of felony kidnapping of Abigail Hernandez, who went missing in Conway, N.H., in October 2013, and returned home last week. Kibby will be arraigned Tuesday in district court in Conway, N.H. (AP Photo/New Hampshire Attorney General's Office)CONWAY, N.H. (AP) ? A New Hampshire man charged with kidnapping a teenage girl nine months ago was ordered held on $1 million bail Tuesday as the girl watched from the front row of the courtroom.



  • Stocks inch up ahead of economic data
  • FILE - This Monday, July 15, 2013 file photo shows the American flag and Wall St. street sign outside the New York Stock Exchange, in New York. European and Asian stocks rose Tuesday, July 29, 2014 ahead of a string of U.S. and Chinese economic reports later this week and despite the possibility of more sanctions on Russia. Wall Street was expected to rise on the open. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)NEW YORK (AP) ? U.S. stock-market indexes were mostly higher in afternoon trading as investors waited for a batch of key economic reports later this week. Earnings reports and corporate news drove trading in individual stocks. Major indexes in Europe and Asia closed with slight gains.



  • Israel intensifies Gaza assault, Egyptians revise truce plan
  • By Nidal al-Mughrabi and Maayan Lubell GAZA/JERUSALEM (Reuters) - Israel knocked out Gaza's only power plant and pounded dozens of other high-profile targets on Tuesday, while Egyptian mediators prepared a revised proposal for halting its war with Islamist militants in the enclave. Israel's Channel Two TV said progress was being made on such a deal in Cairo, where a Palestinian delegation is expected later on Tuesday, although the station retracted an earlier report that a truce had already been provisionally agreed. Health officials said at least 84 Palestinians died in some of heaviest bombardments from air, sea and land since Israel's offensive began on July 8 in response to rocket salvoes fired by Hamas and its militant allies. The Israeli assault intensified after the deaths of 10 troops in Palestinian cross-border attacks on Monday, with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu warning of a long conflict ahead.

  • EU agrees first broad sanctions on Russia; U.S. expected to follow
  • Armed pro-Russian separatists stand guard on the suburbs of ShakhtarskBy Justyna Pawlak and Aleksandar Vasovic BRUSSELS/DONETSK Ukraine (Reuters) - The European Union agreed for the first time on Tuesday to impose broad sanctions against Russian oil companies, banks and defense firms, by far the strongest international action yet over Moscow's support for rebels in eastern Ukraine. The United States could announce new measures of its own "as soon as today", the White House said. The measures mark the start of a new phase in the biggest confrontation between Moscow and the West since the Cold War, which worsened dramatically after the downing of Malaysian flight MH17 over rebel-held territory on July 17 by what Western countries say was a Russian-supplied missile. Russia's state run banks would be barred from raising funds in European capital markets.



  • House to vote on slimmed-down bill for border
  • Speaker of the House John Boehner, R-Ohio, arrives for a meeting of the Republican Conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, July 29, 2014. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)WASHINGTON (AP) ? House Republicans unveiled a slimmed-down bill Tuesday to address the immigration crisis on the U.S.-Mexico border by sending in National Guard troops and speeding migrant youths back home. The election-year measure would allow Republicans to say they tried to solve the humanitarian problem in South Texas, even though it stands no chance of becoming law.



  • Putin may have passed point of no-return over Ukraine
  • Russia's President Vladimir Putin talks to reporters during a meeting in BrasiliaBy Timothy Heritage MOSCOW (Reuters) - Vladimir Putin risks becoming an international pariah over the Ukraine crisis but the Russian president is battening down the hatches for the gathering economic and political storm. The United States and the European Union saw the downing of Malaysian Airlines flight MH17 as a chance for Putin to distance himself from pro-Russian separatists in east Ukraine and seal the border across which they say arms are reaching the rebels. Instead Putin has stood firm, blamed the crash on his pro-Western antagonists in Kiev and signaled no change in his stance, leaving Russia facing the threat of much tougher international sanctions and economic and political isolation. With an about-turn all but impossible for Putin after a fierce media campaign that has demonized the West, painted Ukraine's leaders as fascists and backed the rebels to the hilt, he appears to have passed the point of no-return.



  • Griffin skips worlds due to back injury: report
  • Blake Griffin of the Los Angeles Clippers complains to a referee against the Oklahoma City Thunder in Game Six of the Western Conference Semifinals during the 2014 NBA Playoffs at Staples Center on May 15, 2014 in Los Angeles, CaliforniaLos Angeles Clippers forward Blake Griffin reportedly withdrew from the US team of NBA stars that will defend their world title in a few weeks because of a back injury. The Los Angeles Times reported Tuesday that Griffin has a small fracture in his back that will not require surgery and that rest will permit the injury to heal in time for him to be ready for the Clippers' training camp in September.



  • Woman forgives husband who left son in hot car
  • NEW HAVEN, Conn. (AP) ? A Connecticut woman whose 15-month-old son died this month after her husband left him in a car on a hot day said Tuesday he is an amazing father and that she forgives him.

  • NCAA settles head-injury suit, will change rules
  • FILE - In this Nov. 27, 2004 file photo, Bloomington High School running back Adrian Arrington tries to clear a pile of Providence Catholic defenders during the Class 6A championship football game in Champaign, Ill. Arrington, who later went on to play at Eastern Illinois in Charleston, is the lead plaintiff in a class-action head injury lawsuit working its way through federal court in Chicago. The NCAA and the plaintiffs announced a settlement on Tuesday, July 29, 2014. (AP Photo/ Stephen Haas, File)CHICAGO (AP) ? The NCAA agreed Tuesday to settle a class-action head-injury lawsuit by creating a $70 million fund to diagnose thousands of current and former college athletes to determine if they suffered brain trauma playing football, hockey, soccer and other contact sports.



  • Top Sierra Leone doctor dies of Ebola
  • In this 2014 photo provided by the Samaritan's Purse aid organization, Dr. Kent Brantly, left, treats an Ebola patient at the Samaritan's Purse Ebola Case Management Center in Monrovia, Liberia. On Saturday, July 26, 2014, the North Carolina-based aid organization said Brantly tested positive for the disease and was being treated at a hospital in Monrovia. (AP Photo/Samaritan's Purse)Authorities say the top doctor treating Ebola in Sierra Leone has died from the disease.



  • Obama wrote Putin about violation of nuclear treaty -White House
  • File photo of U.S. President Obama meeting with Russian President Putin during the G8 Summit at Lough Erne in EnniskillenBy Roberta Rampton and Steve Holland WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Barack Obama wrote to Russian President Vladimir Putin to inform him directly that the U.S. government had determined that Russia violated the intermediate-range nuclear treaty, White House spokesman Josh Earnest said on Tuesday. The United States is seeking high-level talks over what it said was an infraction of the Cold War-era treaty, ratified in 1988, which was designed to eliminate ground-launched cruise missiles with ranges of 500 to 5,500 km (310 to 3,400 miles). Earnest declined to comment on how or when Russia violated the treaty, but said the United States is concerned in part about the risk of proliferation. "That is an indication that this is a matter that merits the serious attention of the leaders of both the United States and Russia," Earnest said.



  • Audra McDonald helps 'Lady Day' turn a profit
  • This photo provided by Jeffrey Richards Associates shows Audra McDonald as Billie Holiday in "Lady Day at Emerson's Bar & Grill". McDonald has propelled her new Broadway show into profitability. Producers of the play "Lady Day at Emerson's Bar & Grill" said Tuesday that they?ve recouped their $2.6 million initial investment. In the show, McDonald portrays Billie Holiday in one of her last concerts, offering stories and performing about a dozen of Holiday's best known songs, including "God Bless the Child," "What a Little Moonlight Can Do," and "Strange Fruit." (AP Photo/Jeffrey Richards Associates, Evgenia Eliseeva)NEW YORK (AP) ? Audra McDonald has propelled her new Broadway show into profitability.



  • Iraq warns companies against dealing with oil smuggled by Kurds
  • BAGHDAD (Reuters) - Iraq warned companies on Tuesday against dealing with oil smuggled from the Kurdish region and said it would ensure such cargoes are seized, as U.S. authorities were set to seize a shipment from Iraqi Kurdistan anchored off the Texas coast. "The ministry will keep chasing any shipments in future to legally target any buyers and seize the crude shipments offered for sale," Oil Ministry spokesman Asim Jihad told Reuters. (Reporting by Ahmed Rasheed; Writing by Michael Georgy)

  • U.S. to seize $100 million of Iraqi Kurdish oil in tanker off Texas
  • The oil tanker United Kalavyrta approaches Galveston, TexasBy Anna Driver and Julia Payne HOUSTON/LONDON (Reuters) - U.S. authorities were set on Tuesday to seize a cargo of crude worth more than $100 million from Iraqi Kurdistan anchored off the Texas coast after a judge approved a request from Baghdad, raising the stakes in an oil sales dispute between Iraq's central government and the autonomous region. The tanker United Kalavrvta, carrying some 1 million barrels of Iraqi Kurdish crude oil, arrived near Galveston Bay on Saturday, but has yet to unload its disputed cargo. The U.S. judge's overnight approval of the request from Baghdad on Monday deals another blow to the Kurdistan Regional Government's (KRG) attempts to establish its own oil sales, which are seen as a crucial step in the autonomous region's push for independence.



  • Lawmakers try to seal $225M aid package for Israel
  • In this July 24, 2014, file photo, House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, talks with the media on Capitol Hill in Washington. While much of the rest of the world watches the Gaza war in horror and scrambles for a cease-fire, U.S. lawmakers are pressing the Obama administration to take no action that puts pressure on Israel to halt its military operations. Boehner said Monday, July 28, the administration should "stand with Israel, not just as a broker or observer but as a strong partner." (AP Photo/File)WASHINGTON (AP) ? Democratic and Republican members of Congress scrambled Tuesday to seal a $225 million boost to Israel's Iron Dome missile defense system before they break this week for a month-long recess.



  • Netherlands: new EU sanctions on Russia would have immediate effect
  • Dutch Foreign Minister Frans Timmermans said on Tuesday that sanctions on Russian capital markets being considered by European Union member states in response to the Ukraine crisis would have a "far-reaching and immediate effect". Speaking during a debate about the downing of a Malaysian airliner over rebel-held eastern Ukraine that killed 298 people, most of them Dutch, he said the sanctions would send a strong signal to Moscow that "you are on the wrong path". Earlier, Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte called Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko to ask him to suspend military operations in the area where the airliner came down to allow international experts to reach the crash site.

  • EU agrees economic sanctions on Russia
  • By Justyna Pawlak and Barbara Lewis BRUSSELS (Reuters) - The European Union reached agreement on Tuesday on the bloc's first broad economic sanctions on Russia over its role in Ukraine, diplomats said, marking a new phase in the biggest confrontation between Moscow and the West since the Cold War. The measures will shut state-owned Russian banks out of European capital markets and target the defence sector and sensitive technologies, including oil, but exclude the vital gas sector, on which Europe is heavily dependent. In contrast to the United States, the 28-nation EU, with bigger economic interests at stake, hesitated for months to take decisive action against Moscow. Washington believes flight MH17 was shot down in error by the separatists with a missile supplied by Russia.

  • EU governments agree to impose economic sanctions on Russia
  • BRUSSELS (Reuters) - European Union governments reached a deal on Tuesday to impose economic sanctions against Russia, targeting its oil industry, defense, dual-use goods and sensitive technologies, diplomats said. The sanctions will be reviewed after three months, one diplomat said. (Reporting by Justyna Pawlak and Tom Koerkemeier; editing by Barbara Lewis)

  • U.S. could unveil new sanctions on Russia 'as soon as today': White House
  • By Steve Holland and Roberta Rampton WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The United States could unveil new economic sanctions on Russia over its support for separatists in eastern Ukraine "as soon as today," White House spokesman Josh Earnest said on Tuesday. The new measures would come as the European Union finalizes sanctions against Russia's financial, defense and energy sectors, its most sweeping sanctions so far. We need to assess whether or not these economic costs that are being imposed on Russia have the desired effect," Earnest told reporters in a briefing. The United States has been working closely with the EU to step up sanctions.

  • IMF's Lagarde says Ukraine program may change if conflict lasts
  • The International Monetary Fund's $17 billion loan program for Ukraine may have to be revised if the country's conflict in its eastern regions continues for much longer, the head of the IMF said without specifying further. "(The IMF program) is premised on having a degree of resolution of the current conflict in the not-too-distant future," IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde told reporters on Tuesday.

  • Russia, U.S. agree fighting should stop near crash site in Ukraine -Russia
  • Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov and his U.S. counterpart John Kerry agreed in a phone conversation that fighting near the site where a Malaysian airliner crashed in eastern Ukraine needs to be stopped, Russia's Foreign Ministry said on Tuesday. Russia has denied supplying such a missile.

  • East Ukraine rebels threaten to ban OSCE from plane crash site
  • Rebels in east Ukraine accused the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe on Tuesday of serving U.S. and Ukrainian interests and threatened to ban the security and rights group from the crash site of a Malaysian airliner. The self-proclaimed "Donetsk People's Republic" said in an emailed statement it was going to halt cooperation with the OSCE, until now the main body tasked with negotiating access to the crash site for international experts. "From the very start, the OSCE was not a neutral side and acted in the interests of Ukraine," it said. "The OSCE, as it turns out, is a structure completely controlled by the United States." The OSCE did not immediately comment.